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February 2020

Guns Out: The Splintering of Jamaica's Violent Gangs
Event Date: 
Wednesday, March 4, 2020 - 06:00 to 08:00
Event Location: 
Terra Nova All Suite Hotel
Event Address: 
17 Waterloo Road
Kingston
Kingston
Jamaica

An Economic Assessment of a DRS for PET Bottles

In Jamaica, recuperation of PET bottles from the waste stream for processing and export to be recycled is currently estimated to be five to ten percent. One of our recent studies, which assessed various measures for PET waste management, recommended that a deposit-refund system (DRS) be considered to increase recuperation, and improve management, of PET waste in Jamaica. This study's analysis revealed that it is evident that the economic benefits of a DRS largely outweigh the costs, and should therefore be implemented as a means to manage PET bottle waste. Different DRS configurations do, however, entail different costs and a cost-effective DRS configuration should be adopted for its implementation to be of net benefit to the economy. A retailer-based model, with collections done at major retailers across the country, is more cost effective than a depot model – indeed the depot model’s costs outweigh its benefits. The most cost-effective DRS configuration is one using retailers as collection points, and one which is based on automated returns using reverse vending machines. Here, any fixed and operation costs that would be borne by retailers when participating in the DRS would be covered through revenues generated by the DRS, as the retailer is not expected to cover these costs itself.

Click on the stages below to see articles related to this project

STAGE 1

Inception

STAGE 2

Dissemination

STAGE 3

Deliberation

STAGE 4

Implementation

STAGE 5

Impact

Stage 1

1

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

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Stage 2

2

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

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Stage 3

3

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

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December 31, 1969 | By Author |

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This project is sponsored by

CAPRI and Industry Experts Introduce the Proposed Deposit Refund Scheme (DRS) for Plastic Bottles to the Prime Minister

CAPRI along with industry experts introduced the proposed Deposit Refund Scheme (DRS) for plastic bottles to the Prime Minister, The Most Hon. Andrew Holness, at a meeting that was held on January 28, 2019, at the Office of the Prime Minister.

CAPRI Meets with Industry Experts to Share Recommendations for A Deposit Refund Scheme (DRS) for Plastic Bottles

CAPRI’s Executive Director, Dr Damien King, Director of Sustainability – Dr. Suzanne Shaw, and Researcher – Ms. Desiree Phillips met with industry experts on August 28, 2018 and shared the think tank’s recommendations for a Deposit Refund Scheme (DRS) for plastic bottles. Among the group of experts were The Hon. Daryl Vaz, Minister without Portfolio with responsibility for Land, The Environment, Climate Change and Investment, MEGJC; Mr. Anthony McKenzie, Director of Environmental Management and Conservation, NEPA; Mr. Edson Carr, Projects and Planning Manager, NSWMA; Mr.

CAPRI Launches A Study on the Economic Assessment of a Deposit Refund System (DRS) for PET (Plastic) Bottles

CAPRI launched its study on an economic assessment of a Deposit Refund System (DRS) - a solution for PET bottles in Jamaica, at a public forum on Wednesday, July 25, 2018 at the Terra Nova Hotel. Mr. Edson Carr - Projects and Planning Manager, NSWMA; Mr. Francois Chalifour - Director of Marketing, Wisynco; and Mr. Rohan Brown - Managing Director, Jamaica Recycles joined Dr. Suzanne Shaw - Director of Sustainability, CAPRI on the panel for a discussion on the study's findings. The discussion was moderated by Dr. Diana Thorburn, Director of Research at CAPRI.

CAPRI Explores Solutions for PET (Plastic Bottles) Waste Management

Inexpensive, light, durable and versatile, plastic bottles have become a part of everyday life. They have also come to be one of the biggest sources of pollution of our time: one million plastic bottles are bought around the world every minute, the majority of which are used just once and thrown away, ending up in landfill or in the ocean.

CAPRI in partnership with the European Union, and with Dr. Suzanne Shaw as the Lead Researcher, is undertaking a study seeking to quantify the costs of establishing and operating a system to manage PET waste in Jamaica.

CAPRI Meets with The Bureau of Gender Affairs

On June 12, 2019, CAPRI’s Director of Research, Dr Diana Thorburn, met with Sharon Coburn Robinson, Senior Director (Acting) at the Bureau of Gender Affairs to discuss how Jamaica can move to include women in its development goals.

CAPRI Shares Insights on The Care Economy With WROC

Low labour productivity and unpaid care work continue to be barriers to women’s engagement in the labour market, and thereby hindrances to Jamaica’s continued development.

CAPRI Meets with Minister Williams, Key Stakeholders to Discuss Care Economy Recommendations

While Jamaica is no stranger to the core concepts of the care economy, it has not met its commitments to a host of international agreements that pledge to address the care economy, including and perhaps most significantly the Global Goals which are incorporated into Jamaica’s own national development plan Vision 2030.

CAPRI Launches A Study on Low Labour Productivity And Unpaid Care Work

CAPRI presented the findings of its study on unpaid care work at a public forum on Thursday, November 30, 2017, at the Spanish Court Hotel's Worthington Building. Representatives from the Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, and the University of the West Indies’ Institute for Gender Studies joined CAPRI’s Affiliate Researcher, Dr. Adwoa Onuora, for the panel discussion.

Low Labour Productivity And Unpaid Care Work

Global patterns of the trade-off between paid work whether in the formal or informal economy and unpaid care work hold true for Jamaica. This pilot Time Use Survey (TUS) shows that Jamaica follows the general trend in the differences in the amount of time that men versus women spend on unpaid care work and on paid work. The study shows clearly that the allocation of Jamaican women’s time to unpaid care work has a negative correlation with their labour force participation rates, labour exclusion and gender pay gaps. The data provides an empirical basis on which to argue that there are real costs to the economy of unpaid care work, providing a basis for measures to be taken to reduce those costs. That there is a quantitative basis of the problem shows that relieving women of the burden of unpaid care work can redound to the commercial benefit of the broader economy.

Click on the stages below to see articles related to this project

STAGE 1

Inception

STAGE 2

Dissemination

STAGE 3

Deliberation

STAGE 4

Implementation

STAGE 5

Impact

Stage 1

1

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

Read more

Stage 2

2

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

Read more

Stage 3

3

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

Read more
3

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

Read more
3

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

Read more

This project is sponsored by

CAPRI Seeks to Explore and Better Understand the CARE Economy in Jamaica

Caring for children, the elderly, and sick relatives, as well as household chores, is largely undertaken by women without monetary compensation nor notional economic value ascribed. As a consequence, the economic value of these activities is not reflected in the country’s budgets, nor taken into consideration in planning or policy design.

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