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March 2020

March, 2020
Thematic Area: 

It is widely accepted that citizen security and public safety are the main challenges threatening Jamaica’s growth and
development. With support from the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) CAPRI thus undertook the
Transforming Citizen Security a Yaad project (CSAY). Through this project, which ran from May 2017 to March 2020,
CAPRI produced four reports, on pertinent issues related to citizen security, and a draft crime scorecard. Each report
was launched with a live-streamed public forum that brought together relevant key stakeholders, and where the public was
directly engaged. A number of highlevel key stakeholders participated in the creation of the crime scorecard, with the next
expected step to collaborate with a relevant government agency, and perhaps another civil society organization,
to operationalize it, so it can fulfill its tremendous potential as a tool of improving the state’s accountability to
its citizens.

The reports covered police reform, the efficacy of anti-violence interventions, the relationship between scamming, gangs, and
violence, and an in-depth analysis of Jamaica’s contemporary gang dynamics. These were four critical issues that, expert
stakeholders agreed, would benefit from up-to-date, evidence based research and analysis, to move the debate, thinking, and
policy forward.

March, 2020
Thematic Area: 

It is widely accepted that citizen security and public safety are the principal challenges threatening Jamaica’s growth and development. With support from the UK’s Department for International Development(DFID) CAPRI undertook the Transforming Citizen Security a Yaad project, and produced four reports on pertinent issues related to citizen security. The reports covered police reform, the efficacy of anti-violence interventions, the relationship between scamming, gangs, and violence, and an in-depth analysis of Jamaica’s contemporary gang dynamics. These were four critical issues that, expert stakeholders agreed, would benefit from up-to-date, evidence based research and analysis, to move the debate, thinking, and policy forward.

March, 2020
Thematic Area: 

Any country which wants to maximize the productivity of its workforce, and to harness the full potential of its people towards economic growth and development, must proactively reduce or eliminate discrimination against groups of people who are excluded from full participation as a result of that discrimination.

In Jamaica, where discrimination against LGBT people is rife and amply documented, such discrimination results in a senseless waste of human potential, with negative implications for the country’s economic growth prospects. This report examines the landscape of sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination in Jamaica, and how that discrimination can be directly and indirectly tied to negative economic and social outcomes and thwarted developmental prospects.

March, 2020
Thematic Area: 

Gangs, organized crime, and violence, and the nexus between them, are Jamaica’s biggest citizen security challenge. With the second highest murder rate in the Latin America and Caribbean region in 2019, Jamaica’s extreme violence is often attributed to gangs. Between 2008 and 2018, gang-related violence was responsible for 56 percent of murders in Jamaica, with a high of 78 percent in 2013. Jamaica is a violent country in other ways, with extraordinarily high rates of domestic violence, including intimate partner (IPV) and gender-based violence (GBV). Jamaica’s violence problem is so pernicious that the country has come to be described by academics and policy makers as having a “culture of violence.”

In an effort to bring focused attention to Jamaica’s gang problem, with the objective of advancing knowledge towards more effective policies and programmes for gang prevention and control, this report synthesizes what is known about:

1. The current scenario regarding gangs, violence, and organized crime in its various iterations, in Jamaica, with an emphasis on the post-2010 situation;

2. The difficulties Jamaica has had inresolving the gang problem;

3. The current strategies being employed to deal with the gang problem; and

4. The success or failure of these strategies.

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