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May 2020

CAPRI Explores a National Identification System for Jamaica

From the 1970s, discussions surrounding the implementation of a National Identification System (NIDS) begun. Since then, there have been numerous efforts to pass legislation and curate the required technical assistance needed to build a strong national ID system. In April 2019, the Supreme Court struck down the National Identification and Registration Act, upon being challenged by the People’s National Party. Following this decision, the need to better communicate and explain to the general public the purpose and benefits of a National Identification System (NIDS) has become self-evident.

A National Identification System

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December 31, 1969 | By Author |

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CAPRI Hosts Public Forum on Barriers to Women’s Entrepreneurship

CAPRI’s public forum, Closed for Business: Barriers to Women's Entrepreneurship, was held on Wednesday, November 20, 2019, at the UWI Mona Visitors Lodge. Mrs. Ethnie Miller Simpson, President, Women Entrepreneurs Network of the Caribbean (WENC); Mrs. Beverly Darby Collins, Senior Director, Social Services/home Economics Unit, Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA); and Mr. Hugh Johnson, President, Small Business Association of Jamaica (SBAJ) were invited to join Dr. Damien King, CAPRI's Executive Director, in the panel discussion. The evening’s discussion was moderated by Mr.

CAPRI Investigates the Barriers to Women’s Entrepreneurship

Obstacles to women’s entrepreneurship is a problem that is not peculiar to Jamaica; it hinders development on an international scale. Jamaica is deemed to be having the highest proportion of women managers in the world but there are proportionately far fewer women entrepreneurs. A deep understanding of this issue will provide best approaches and support for women’s entrepreneurship.

Barriers to Women's Entrepreneurship

Countries throughout the world promote and support women’s entrepreneurship because it is recognised as an important strategy to address poverty and promote economic growth.

Women who create, run and grow businesses are fundamental drivers for economic growth, poverty reduction, and development. There is a positive relationship between self-employed women entrepreneurs and the growth of gross domestic product. Women’s consumption patterns tend to be child-focused, and geared towards serving their families and/or communities; women reinvest more than 60 per cent more of their money into the household than men. Women’s entrepreneurship is thus expected to have a “multiplier effect,” resulting in prosperous communities, inclusive societies, and progressive economies. However, women’s potential in business has not been as impactful as it might
be, due, it is thought, to social and cultural limitations. Thus many countries are not
realizing their full entrepreneurial potential owing to the lack of participation by females in
new business activities.

Click on the stages below to see articles related to this project

STAGE 1

Inception

STAGE 2

Dissemination

STAGE 3

Deliberation

STAGE 4

Implementation

STAGE 5

Impact

Stage 1

1

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

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Stage 2

2

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

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CAPRI Assesses Intervention Programmes Targeting Unattached Youth

CAPRI’s in depth research on crime and security, has reinforced the conclusion that diverting  young  unattached  males  from  crime  and  violence  is  the  most  important goal  for  any  intervention  strategy. The  perpetrators  of  the  vast  majority  of  violent crimes    in    Jamaica    are    young,    unattached    males—unskilled,    unemployed, undereducated  men,  15-29  years  old,  from  poor  urban  neighbourhoods.

Assessment of Intervention Programmes Targeting Unattached Youth

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STAGE 1

Inception

STAGE 2

Dissemination

STAGE 3

Deliberation

STAGE 4

Implementation

STAGE 5

Impact

Stage 1

1

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

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CAPRI Investigates the Quality of Care for Children in State Care

CAPRI’s  undertaking  of  the  UNICEF  Situation  Analysis  of  Children  in  Jamaica  in 2018  brought  home  to  us  that  in  some  areas  youth  are  a  subset  of  the  general population  and  face  many  of  the  same  problems  that  all  Jamaicans  face,  but  that almost  without  exception,  the  problems  are  exacerbated  in  their  effects  on  children, and they have challenges that are unique to their age and vulnerability.

Quality of State Care for Children in Jamaica

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STAGE 1

Inception

STAGE 2

Dissemination

STAGE 3

Deliberation

STAGE 4

Implementation

STAGE 5

Impact

Stage 1

1

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

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This project is sponsored by

CAPRI Attends International Budget Partnership Dissemination Workshop in Nairobi

The Internation Budget Partnership (IBP) hosted a dissemination workshop, in Nairobi Kenya, in February 2020, to help member states draft a dissemination plan for the 2019 open budget survey (OBS). The OBS measures the government's effectiveness in three main areas: transparency, public participation and budget oversight. Based on these areas, an assessment is done and the appropriate recommendations made. Using these recommendations, IBP representatives guided the researchers in selecting Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-based (SMART) priority and secondary goals.

Open Budget Survey

The International Budget Partnership works in collaboration with multiple actors – including civil society, state actors, international institutions, and the private sector – to bring about a world in which empowered citizens participate in open, inclusive budgeting processes to shape policies and practices that promote equity and justice on a sustainable basis.

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STAGE 1

Inception

STAGE 2

Dissemination

STAGE 3

Deliberation

STAGE 4

Implementation

STAGE 5

Impact

Stage 3

3

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

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CAPRI Discusses Findings of Working Paper on the Economic Value of Urban Public Spaces with Stakeholders

In some cities, public space has been an important driver of tourism, small business development, and has enhanced the value of surrounding property. However, in Jamaica, much attention is not given to the economic value of high-quality public spaces, particularly in urban communities.

CAPRI Explores The Economic Value of Urban Public Spaces

Public spaces are important to successful communities and cities. Well-functioning public spaces facilitate the growth and accumulation of social capital, and promote the well-being of citizens.These recreational spaces are often seen mainly for their aesthetic value, and are often regarded as “nice to have” but not essential. CAPRI in partnership with the European Union with Ms. Desiree Phillips as the Researcher is conducting a study which draws from case studies and will explore evidence of economic value added by existing public spaces.

The Economic Value of Urban Public Spaces

The purpose of this study was to gather evidence of the economic impact of well-designed and maintained public spaces, not to carry out an extensive economic impact analysis. Drawing from international case studies examined in this report, as well as the case of Emancipation Park, there is a preponderance of evidence demonstrating the economic impact of public spaces. In some cities, public space has been an important driver of tourism, and of small business development, and has enhanced the value of nearby property. In Jamaica the impact on health, direct value, and property value is evident. Further, with only 17 percent of visitors to Emancipation Park living in the New Kingston area, and nearly two-thirds living in other areas of Kingston and St. Andrew, there is a clear need for similar recreational spaces to be created in other areas of Kingston and St. Andrew. Taking into account all the evidence presented, there is a strong case for an increase in public investment in public spaces in urban areas.

Click on the stages below to see articles related to this project

STAGE 1

Inception

STAGE 2

Dissemination

STAGE 3

Deliberation

STAGE 4

Implementation

STAGE 5

Impact

Stage 1

1

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

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Stage 3

3

December 31, 1969 | By Author |

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This project is sponsored by

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